Posts Tagged “Single Malt”

Kingsbarns Dream to Dram (46%)

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Kingsbarns Dream to Dram (46%)

Kingsbarns is truly the story of a dream turning into a dram. If there’s something Scotland is known for just as much as whisky, it’s golf, and this is a story of how both met in the mind of Douglas Clement, who was a caddie at the Kingsbarns Golf Links for over a dozen years….

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Glen Garioch 18 Year Old Renaissance Chapter 4 (50.2%)

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Glen Garioch 18 Year Old Renaissance Chapter 4 (50.2%)

The release of the Glen Garioch Renaissance Chapter 4 is a moment I’ve been waiting for ever since the onset of the Renaissance project back in 2014. The idea was to have a look at the whisky the distillery was producing since it came back to life in 1997, by showcasing the whisky’s progressive development…

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Balblair 17 (46%)

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Balblair 17 (46%)

Balblair revamped also the duty free range, offering the 12, 15 and the future 25 years old in travel retail, but has chosen to offer the Balblair 17 instead of the 18 year old.¬†Why keep 75% of your core range on travel retail shelves just to replace a single expression? This is the third time…

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Balblair’s New Core Range: Balblair 12 (46%), Balblair 15 (46%), Balblair 18 (46%)

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Balblair’s New Core Range: Balblair 12 (46%), Balblair 15 (46%), Balblair 18 (46%)

So Balblair went ahead and did it. They have actually taken the one thing that made them totally special and chucked it out the window. No longer specific vintages with an ever changing core range, rather a regular and quite mundane aged range, with a Balblair 12, 15, 18 and 25, with a 17 year…

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Glen Garioch Virgin Oak No. 2 (48%)

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Glen Garioch Virgin Oak No. 2 (48%)

I’ll come out and say it: I’m a fan of the use of virgin oak in Scotch whisky and think that there isn’t enough of it used. I’m sure this will be controversial, but it’s my opinion, and I’ve stated it before. Of course, with a few exceptions, full maturation in virgin oak is something…

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