Posts Tagged “Closed Distilleries”

The St. Magdalene Engineers’ Beauty – Lost Distilleries Finale

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The St. Magdalene Engineers’ Beauty – Lost Distilleries Finale

Having reviewed the five other drams that were part of the `Gone But Never Forgotten’, we now arrive at my favorite dram of the flight, the St. Magdalene 20 year old, bottled for the 100th anniversary of Diageo Engineering  at the Ainslie & Heilbron’s buildings at 64 Waterloo Street in Glasgow, also depicted on the…

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Royally Silenced – Glenury Royal 36 – Lost Distilleries V

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Royally Silenced – Glenury Royal 36 – Lost Distilleries V

Three distilleries got the distinction of being “royal”. You’d think that that would be a guarantee of longevity for a business, but it isn’t. Glenury Royal was located in the town of Stonehaven in the Eastern Highlands, south of Aberdeen and near other closed distilleries such as Glenesk, Lochside and North Port, in the vicinity of Fettercairn…

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A Surprising Old Convalmore – Silent Distilleries IV

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A Surprising Old Convalmore – Silent Distilleries IV

Convalmore is a fascinating distillery, albeit one you don’t hear much about. The distillery never had its own bottlings, although Gordon and MacPhail regularly bottled whisky from the distillery in the Connoisseur’s Choice series. There’s a saying that “Rome was built on seven hills, and Dufftown built on seven stills”. Two of the seven are no…

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A Brora for the Ages – Silent Distilleries III

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A Brora for the Ages – Silent Distilleries III

The Brora was the only peated whisky in the Gone But Never Forgotten tasting, and was the anchor against which all other whiskies were nosed. Diageo’s Colin Dunn is not one to do things by the book, and his tastings leap all over the place between the whiskies in the glasses. There’s method to the…

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Lost Distilleries Part II – What Happened to Glenesk?

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Lost Distilleries Part II – What Happened to Glenesk?

Glenesk Distillery was known by five names over the eight decades it was in operation: Highland Esk (1897), North Esk (1899), Montrose (1938), Hillside (1964) and finally Glenesk (1980). This is one of the many distilleries that were born out of the late 19th century boom in whisky, and drowned in the great whisky loch of the…

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